Why Don’t We Just Kill All Mosquitoes?

It’s a pretty well-known fact that the single most deadly animal on the planet isn’t a snake, shark, or a lion. It’s actually the tiny yet irritating insect called the mosquito. Mosquitoes carry many very harmful and even deadly diseases. These include malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever, West Nile, and Chikungunya. Mosquito-borne diseases affect several million people every year, killing around one million yearly.

So, why we don’t simply create a way to kill all of the mosquitoes on Earth? That would surely not only resolve the deadliest animal problem but also would be a huge relief to many people. Not only are mosquitoes the deadliest, but they’re also the most annoying insect in the world.

Can we kill all mosquitoes?

Well, we actually can’t simply kill all mosquitoes for a few reasons. The first is that there’s no way to predict what the ecological effects of a world without mosquitoes would be. There isn’t any particular animal or insect species that relies solely on mosquitoes for food. But mosquitoes are still a part of many food chains. They’re also an instrumental part of our ecosystem. Scientists have no idea what eliminating mosquitoes could do to the ecosystem.

Second, there isn’t one specific way to eliminate all mosquitoes. There are more than 3000 different mosquito species in the world. They live basically everywhere from the Amazon rainforest to Central Park in New York. It would be impossible to just up and kill all mosquitoes in one go and would probably be a very difficult and painfully slow process. With the unknown consequences involved, it would be hard to get everyone to sign off on killing all mosquitoes.

Third, if we go ahead and try to eliminate mosquitoes, we’d have to harm or destroy their habitats as well. As we said, mosquitoes can be found almost everywhere. So, this process of killing mosquitoes could do more harm to the areas we live in than the mosquitoes currently do to us.

Fourth, all mosquito species are very different from each other. This means it might be quite difficult to design a method that could efficiently kill all of the 3000+ species that live on our planet.

Conclusion

Imagine that scientists succeeded in creating a method that could kill all mosquitoes. Why would we want to eliminate those mosquito species that don’t carry diseases and don’t even bite humans or animals? It’s better to simply accept that there are mosquitoes in the world.

Instead of killing them all, why not learn how to control them with tools like mosquito repellents and mosquito foggers? Otherwise, we might risk creating a world in which mosquitoes could be replaced with a more deadly species. Or, by killing all mosquitoes, we might even do irreparable harm to our ecosystem.

2 Comments

Jodi

I live in orlando florida they been spraying the area where I live either by air or truck ( think air ) and its killing alot more then the Mosquito’s, I have hydroponic set up and it killed everything in the water, frogs, fish, snails ( I had rare apple snails and nery’s ) all dead, today I found the three tree frogs just skeletons and when I used a net to get them out they turned to paste, water was toxic. thats just one tank. Killing all these bugs are also killing bats, that eat them. Some one needs to do something who do I call.?

    Karen

    Hi Jodi,
    I would contact the council of Orlando city for more information. As far as I known, they are currently monitoring the spread of Zika virus and the spraying of insecticide might be done to eliminate mosquitoes carrying this disease.

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