What to Do If There Is a Mosquito in My Room

If there is one insect that has proven to be a nuisance to the human race, it is definitely the mosquito. These unwelcome health wreckers have mastered the art of vigilance like a military-trained intelligence unit. You can hear them and feel their bites, but you cannot see them. They possess the power to carry deadly diseases and pass them onto humans. If you find yourself asking, “What can I do if there is a mosquito in my room?” then you are one step ahead in protecting yourself from these suckers. (Pun intended.)

For your adventure, you will need a golden helmet, a sword from the River Zambezi, and one of Zeus’ thunderbolts. Not really. It is actually quite simple to kill a mosquito in your house. While the challenge lies actually in finding it, you can still obliterate the insect even in its hideouts. Below, we will explain five ways to do so.

How to kill a mosquito when you cannot find it?

1. Use a mosquito net

Sleeping under a mosquito net is an extremely effective, cheap way to keep those bloodsuckers away from you, especially when you are facing an army of them. Several species of mosquitoes are most active when we are asleep (dusk, dawn, or during the night). So, sleeping under a TREATED mosquito net is like having a divine shield of protection from the enemy. Your mosquito net will act as a barrier and the chemical on the net will kill those mosquitoes who dare to touch it. Do this for a series of nights and voila, the mosquitoes will either die from starvation or will leave to seek greener pastures.

mosquito net

Kheng Guan Toh/Shutterstock.com

2. Wear long pants and long sleeves to bed

Even though it’s hot in the summer, wearing long pants and long sleeves will leave less of your skin exposed. This means fewer opportunities for mosquitoes to bite you. If you kick your covers off in the middle of the night, you will still be better protected than if you wore shorts and short sleeves.

3. Use bug repellent

So, let’s say that you find a net somewhat suffocating and too bulky for your bedroom, which you should not since malaria and yellow fever are no joke. In that case, using any bug repellent for the bedroom is a good choice, too. These are applied to the skin, clothing, bedding, and/or other surfaces and their odor discourages insects from landing on those items. Only apply repellent to the topmost bedding. Do not apply them to the face, pillows, beneath the covers, or under your clothing. Unfortunately, the use of these repellents, in the long run, will make you need to bathe more and wash your clothes and bedding more frequently.

4. Use insecticides

Maybe you want your room to stay as it is. You want to apply nothing to your skin or clothing. Using insecticides will come as a saving grace in that case.

Most insecticides are made from pyrethrins or pyrethroids, which are products that attack insects’ nervous systems, causing paralysis and death. Pyrethrins are naturally derived from chrysanthemum flowers while pyrethroids are synthetic versions of pyrethrins.

Make sure to choose a product labeled for indoor mosquito control. These can be foggers/aerosols or sprays. Foggers and aerosols release pesticides into the air. Everyone (including pets) must leave the house if you use such devices. Once the insecticide has dried, you can go back home. Check the label to find out how long you’ll need to stay out. When you use sprays, you don’t have to leave the house, but you should not remain in the room once you’ve finished spraying. Spray surfaces where mosquitoes are likely to land. They seek out cool, humid, and dark spaces, so spray in enclosed areas and behind and underneath furniture. Inhaling insecticides can be dangerous to your health. We recommend wearing a dust mask or otherwise covering your nose and mouth while spraying. Keep children and pets outside of the room while you’re spraying and until the spray has dried. Check the label for drying times. The World Health Organization recommends only spraying in emergency situations while some researchers caution against using insecticide sprays at all.

5. Use a mosquito trapping system

This option can be a bit expensive but may be quite effective. Mosquito traps work by attracting mosquitoes with a combination of lures, often carbon dioxide, heat, and light. When a mosquito flies in for a closer look, a vacuuming fan sucks them into the trap interior. They’re either captured in a net, on a sticky surface, or are electrocuted by an electric plate/grid. In tests, traps from different companies caught different species of mosquitoes at different rates. Your best bet is to research different traps to find ones that are rated for indoor control and have demonstrated effectiveness.

How to find a mosquito?

You can hear a mosquito buzzing around your ear. You find yourself thinking, “I have a mosquito in my house.” You turn on the lights. Boom. Nothing. No one. This cycle continues through the night. However, there is a way to find that tiny little terrorist. Turn on a flashlight when you hear that telltale buzz. Put the flashlight directly on the wall so that the beam runs in a straight line across the wall. Watch carefully for any shadows. If the mosquito is on the wall, its shadow will be huge. (Physics come into play here.) Do rotate the flashlight in all directions until you find the mosquito. Obliterate that sucker with the palm of your hand or with any hard object with a large surface area. You can also leave a single small light source on like a lamp and wait for the mosquito to approach it. It should land on the wall near the light source, where you can find it with your flashlight and kill it. 

If you cannot find the mosquito using a flashlight, disrupt its hiding areas. Use a cloth to scare it out from under the bed, from in the drawers, from the ceiling, or on the walls. Once you identify it, smash it.

You can also stay up and wait. As I said, mosquitoes are attracted to carbon dioxide, heat, and light. Shut off all lights and use your phone or tablet to browse the internet or to read eBooks. Breathe heavily in the direction of your phone or tablet. Do not wear any headphones because your ears will be your biggest asset here. Eventually, the mosquito won’t be able to resist the light and carbon dioxide and will approach. If it’s still staying away, try doing some light exercise. You’ll generate more heat and you might even sweat. Mosquitoes love the smell of sweat. Once it comes close enough, kill that sucker.

How to keep mosquitoes out of your room

It is futile to get rid of the mosquitoes you encounter without taking measures to prevent them from entering in the future. Here are simple things you can do to prevent them from coming back because these little pests never give up.

1. Grow some mosquito repellent plants

There are some plants that repel mosquitoes. This is also a good way to avoid using insecticides all the time as these plants produce a mild odor that mosquitoes find unappealing. Mosquito-repellent plants can also help make your house look more lively, be used as herbs, and are natural air fresheners. Some mosquito repelling plants include basil, lemon balm, lemongrass, lemon verbena, lemon eucalyptus, lemon thyme, peppermint, lavender, catnip, bee balm, clove, pennyroyal, citronella grass, marigolds, rosemary, garlic, and Venus flytraps (an insectivorous plant). Aside from insectivorous plants, you can’t just plant a bunch of herbs and call it a day. They don’t repel mosquitoes just by existing. You have to get them to release their oils. This is fairly simple: just rub a few leaves between your fingers until they start to break apart. 

2. Get rid of stagnant water around the house

Just getting rid of the mosquitoes in your bedroom is not enough. You must eliminate their breeding grounds. Mosquitoes breed in stagnant water. The pupae transform into full adults in stagnant water. Pour out any standing water that has pooled in containers around your yard. If you have bird baths, rain barrels, or potted plant trays, be sure to change the water weekly. If you have large water features, such as ponds or pools, make sure they are constantly circulating and keep pools chlorinated. Keep fish in your ponds to eat mosquitoes and larvae. For larger unintentional pools, create a path for water to flow out. If you can’t remove standing water, add the bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis, which kills mosquito eggs.

3. Trim the grass and bushes

Mosquitoes may hide in grass and bushes, especially when you chase them away from your house. So, getting rid of long grass and bushes or trimming them will take their hiding grounds away from them.

Trimm grass

Goffkein.pro/Shutterstock.com

4. Keep your home clean

As with most insects, having a tidy, well-kept bedroom prevents mosquitoes from hiding under the mess and therefore makes them more easy to spot and eliminate.

5. Don’t let them in

One of the best ways to keep mosquitoes from getting into your room is to keep them out of the house. Make sure all windows have screens. The best screens to keep mosquitoes out have a mesh size of 1.2 mm (0.047 in). Keep those screens maintained. Any holes offer mosquitoes a way in. Cover or fill in gaps around doors and windows. 

2 Comments

Jessica Rosales

My self and my two year old are getting eaten alive ,

    InsectCop

    We have some articles that might help you, you can look them up on our page. Or you can go straight to reading our article about getting rid of mosquitoes to find various methods to choose from.

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